Burning Hearts

Both of these were taken at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis one outside and one in. I made a brief visit there yesterday afternoon, but more from that visit later. Did you know that it is the biggest collection mosaics in the world? The detail of the Sacred Heart is from the icon mentioned in the Wikipedia article, and is quite different in coloration and style from the rest of the basilica, which is more Byzantine (I think) and gaudy (though a less perjorative adjective may be in order). Even the Basillica itself has several different styles and colorations in it, depending on when and by whom the mosaics were made. I like the early work best, done by an Italian artist if I remember correctly, which is more muted and consists of what I describe as “darker pastels,” if that is not an oxymoron. However, some of the more golden, shiny work of the rest of the basilica, can be truly glorious, to properly use and overused word. OK, pedantic talking over, on to two thousand more eloquent words than mine.
IMG_3326small.jpg
IMG_3281small.jpg

Burning Hearts

Both of these were taken at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis one outside and one in. I made a brief visit there yesterday afternoon, but more from that visit later. Did you know that it is the biggest collection mosaics in the world? The detail of the Sacred Heart is from the icon mentioned in the Wikipedia article, and is quite different in coloration and style from the rest of the basilica, which is more Byzantine (I think) and gaudy (though a less perjorative adjective may be in order). Even the Basillica itself has several different styles and colorations in it, depending on when and by whom the mosaics were made. I like the early work best, done by an Italian artist if I remember correctly, which is more muted and consists of what I describe as “darker pastels,” if that is not an oxymoron. However, some of the more golden, shiny work of the rest of the basilica, can be truly glorious, to properly use and overused word. OK, pedantic talking over, on to two thousand more eloquent words than mine.
IMG_3326small.jpg
IMG_3281small.jpg

New Catapult – Dressing Up

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A new issue of Catapult magazine is out, bursting at the seams (Pun Entirely Intented) with interesting articles. Can I just tell you how much I wanted to write an article for this issue on “Dressing Up?” In fact, two Sundays ago, I had a collection of lines and concepts I wanted to write about all jostling for attention. Sadly, I knew that I really could not choose to become “with article,” as generally when I am writing one I will work on little else until it is done. Sigh.
At any rate, I am rather comforted by the fine selection of articles that the issue has, some covering some of the same ground I would have done. First, Kirstin Vander Giessen-Reitsma’s editiorial, thoughtfully well written as always, considers the gains and losses of our culture of casualness.
If it’s merely brand snobbery that we’re abandoning in a more casual culture, that’s no great loss. But I don’t feel a sense of sadness on account of missed opportunities to show off expensive clothing or flaunt beauty competitively. In fact, I think part of the problem is that people in the U.S. and Canada are generally too wealthy; we’ve lost our sense of dressing up for a special occasion. Why take the time to make an elegant dress for summer weddings when one can just throw on one of several dresses from the Old Navy clearance rack? We’re so overwhelmed with stuff that we can’t conceptualize bringing out the same special outfit year after year for Christmas Eve. Instant pop cultural Halloween costumes are widely available and so inexpensive that it’s not worth the time to create something from scratch. And suits and ties have come to represent tailored prisons, as opposed to a gesture of respect and celebration.
In the communal article “Dressed Up Memories,” Jeremy Huggins and Dennis Haack have wonderful reflections. I also enjoyed “Dressing Up” and “The secret lives of dresses, Vol. 1,” a story told by a dress.